The Hatching 3: Zero Day by Ezekiel Boone (Book Review)

Zero Day is the third instalment of Ezekiel Boone’s terrifying spider apocalypse trilogy, and after reading all of the edge-of-your-seat suspense and action in The Hatching, I had high hopes that this would be a really exciting and creepy set of books.

In The Hatching the world has been overrun with an extremely ancient species of cannibalistic, human-eating spider. After wreaking absolute chaos all over the planet, these terrifying spiders suddenly retreat, appearing to die in the process. At first, the monstrous threat is believed to be over. Then, thousands of egg sacs are discovered in various locations all over Los Angeles, including a large infestation covering the interior of the Staples Centre. These egg sacs are soon discovered all over the world.

Unfortunately in Skitter, book 2 of The Hatching trilogy, just when people begin to think that they are handling the situation, burning these egg sacs before they have a chance to hatch, it quickly becomes apparent that the problem is far too large and widespread for their initial efforts to be successful; Many strategically hidden egg sacs will survive and the spiders will return. Also as if all of this wasn’t bad enough, a massive glowing, pulsating egg sac as large as a pickup truck is discovered in Shinjin Prefecture, Japan.

Now, faced with the knowledge that 10% of the people in Los Angeles who survived the first wave of spider attacks are carrying egg sacs inside them, and that a large proportion of these individuals have been released from the quarantine zone, the President of the United States of America must accept that the spider problem is no longer contained, and drastic measures much be taken to ensure the survival of the human race.

How far will the American government go to safeguard their country, and how many people will die as a result? Can these spiders be defeated? Is anywhere safe from this terrifying threat? And just what is up with these giant glowing egg sacs?

 

Zero Day, like both of its predecessors, contains rather a lot of unnecessary dialogue, and persistently jumps around from one location to another. Some of these locations and events are meaningful and play an integral role in the story, however some are only briefly mentioned and simply serve the purpose of showing the epic scale of the disaster. As mentioned previously in earlier reviews, I think it would have made more sense to have stuck with a smaller number of strategic locations, helping to slim down the story a little and helping readers to keep track of events with a more limited number of characters.

Since this is the final book of The Hatching trilogy I had expected there too be far more action, and squeamishly terrifying events than there actually turned out to be. As such it was a little disappointing, rating at just 2 out of 5 stars. It did however, wrap the story up with a nice neat bow, bringing all of the different strands of the story together and coming to a satisfying conclusion.

 

See Also:

Book 1: The Hatching

Book 2: Skitter

The Mansion

Author: Sarah

I review science fiction, fantasy and horror novels.

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