Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K Rowling (Book Review)

During the summer holidays Harry Potter has a dream that Lord Voldemort and his servant Wormtail (AKA Peter Pettigrew) are plotting to murder him and he suddenly finds himself wide awake with the lightning shaped scar on his forehead burning. A few days later he attends the Quidditch World Cup Final with the Weasley’s and Hermione, where Death Eaters attack Muggles and Voldemort’s Dark Mark is summoned.

Meanwhile, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is playing host to the first Triwizard Tournament in over a century, a magical competition between the three largest European Schools of Wizardry: Hogwarts, Beauxbatons and Durmstrang. One champion from each school is to be selected by the Goblet of Fire to compete in three dangerous and potentially deadly tasks, but somehow Harry Potter’s name is also drawn as a 4th competitor, much to everyone’s surprise.

Believing Harry to be seeking fame and attention, the backlash he faces from his fellow students, competitors and teachers leaves the young wizard feeling rather lonely. Especially since his best friend Ron, like everyone else, refuses to believe that he has been set up and did not enter his own name into the goblet.

Harry suspects that Lord Voldemort is to blame for the situation, probably hoping that the trials will kill him, but can he prove his innocence and finish the tournament alive?

The Goblet of Fire is the longest book in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series so far, and despite its detailed descriptions and complex storylines, every word has a meaning and purpose. Rowling only fills the pages of her novels with important facts that are necessary to the plot, and her writing matures drastically with every book.

At 4.5 out of 5 stars, book number four plays host to a spectacular magical tournament filled with an extensive variety of magical creatures, while also continuing on with the main theme that runs throughout the entire series of novels, the connection between Harry Potter and his nemesis Lord Voldemort. 

See also:

Book 1 – The Philosopher’s Stone

Book 2 – The Chamber of Secrets

Book 3 – The Prisoner of Azkaban

Book 5 – Order of the Phoenix

Book 6 – The Half-Blood Prince

Book 7 – The Deathly Hallows

Divergent Trilogy: Reviews of Books 2 & 3

Divergent Trilogy: Book 2 – Insurgent

After all of the fast-paced action and excitement of Divergent, the follow-up seemed very lethargic and slow. Insurgent began exactly where Divergent left off with Tris, Caleb and Four on the run from the Erudite and Dauntless forces. In the early parts of the book the characters travelled around between different factions, without much of real importance or consequence happening.

I really struggled to read Insurgent as the story dragged without much real purpose. There was far, far too much focus on the relationship issues between Tris and Four, as they constantly bickered, kept secrets and repeatedly antagonised each other.

Having suffered my way to the end of this book, I discovered that the story didn’t really conclude in any meaningful way, but continues on into the next, and final, book of the series. If the dialogue in Insurgent had been trimmed down and there had been better focus, instead of all the confusion of running around between factions, this might have been interesting. However, I’m really disappointed in the direction of this novel and it makes me somewhat reluctant to continue reading.

At 1 out of 5 stars, I wouldn’t recommend Insurgent. Divergent was a fantastic book, but this one was just boring, stretched out with tedious, irritating and pointless dialogue to flesh it out. No real story progression or character development, with Tris constantly complaining and feeling sorry for herself.

 

Divergent Trilogy: Book 3 – Allegiant

Simply to round-out this series and complete my reviews, I pressed forward and read the final book in the trilogy. However, I found it difficult to focus with the story’s perspectives constantly switching between Tris and Four, as it was hard to keep track and distinguish between them. It seemed to be a persistent battle to remember which perspective I was following, as there was no difference between them and the chapters were so short that they switched viewpoints regularly.

However, one consolation was that this novel provided the answers to questions I had after reading the first book. But since this is revealed fairly early on in the story, it just makes it doubly difficult to finish reading. At 0.5 out of 5 stars I really can’t recommend Allegiant to anyone, as its only redeeming feature is the origin story. This book is extremely monotonous, and so long that I honestly thought it was never going to end.

If you really want to check out the Divergent series, then I suggest that you watch the movies. The films are a lot more entertaining and the story moves at a much faster pace. However all that cool sci-fi tech you see in the movies, they don’t exist in the books. Just be aware that, as with most adaptations, somewhere along the line the books and films become very, very different.

 

See also:

Divergent Trilogy: Book 1

The Hunger Games Trilogy: Book 1

Divergent Trilogy: Book 1 – Divergent by Veronica Roth (Book Review)

The Divergent Trilogy is a dystopian young adult fantasy series set in an alternate reality where the USA is split into different factions, with each faction having unique mannerisms, rules and dress codes. On turning 16, main character Tris must join her classmates in taking the Aptitude Test, which determines their future, by placing them definitively in one of the five separate factions: Abnegation, Erudite, Candor, Dauntless or Amity. Once decided during the Choosing Ceremony, each pupil then leaves to join their chosen faction and train to complete the initiation process. Failure is not an option worth contemplating.

….possible spoiler warning…

Continue reading “Divergent Trilogy: Book 1 – Divergent by Veronica Roth (Book Review)”

Supernatural: Carved In Flesh by Tim Waggoner (Book Review)

Carved In Flesh is the twelfth book in the series of TV Tie-in novels from the CW show Supernatural, and is written by Tim Waggoner. It takes place during season seven between episodes 12 (Time After Time) and 13 (The Slice Girls).

 

…spoiler warning for those not familiar and up-to-date with the TV series…

Continue reading “Supernatural: Carved In Flesh by Tim Waggoner (Book Review)”

Olympian Challenger: Book 3 – Olympian Reckoning (Book Review)

Olympian Reckoning is the third book in the urban fantasy romance trilogy Olympian Challenger, by Astrid Arditi.

 

…warning: spoiler alert for those who haven’t read the first two books…

 Check out my review of book one, Olympian Challenger here.

As well as my review of book two, Olympian Heritage via this link.

Continue reading “Olympian Challenger: Book 3 – Olympian Reckoning (Book Review)”

Supernatural: Rite of Passage by John Passarella (Book Review)

Rite of Passage is actually book number ten – released before Fresh Meat, but chronologically takes place later – in the series of TV Tie-in novels from the CW show Supernatural, and is the second to be written by John Passarella. It takes place during season seven between episodes 8 (Season Seven, Time for a Wedding!) and 9 (How to Win Friends and Influence Monsters).

 

…possible spoiler warning for those not familiar with the TV series…

Continue reading “Supernatural: Rite of Passage by John Passarella (Book Review)”

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling (Book Review)

The future looks grim for thirteen year old student wizard, Harry Potter when Lord Voldemort’s sidekick, Sirius Black escapes from Azkaban, the Wizard Prison.

Sirius Black is said to have murdered thirteen people with a single curse, twelve years previously, resulting in the Ministry of Magic locking him away in the fortress known as Azkaban. The prison is guarded by hooded creatures known as Dementors, which suck the joy out of everything around them and the island is supposed to be so secure that it is impossible to escape from. However, Sirius Black has somehow managed to do just that. The madman is now evading capture and seeks revenge on the one person who has lost him everything: Harry Potter.

With Sirius Black looking to commit another murder, Harry is on lockdown inside Hogwart’s School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, unable even to visit the local village, Hogsmeade with the rest of his fellow 3rd year students.

Would Sirius Black dare to break in to Hogwarts with Professor Dumbledore in charge and the Dementors on guard outside the school gates? Is he planning to bring Lord Voldemort back into power and if so, will he be successful?

The Prisoner of Azkaban is the third novel in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series and at 5 out of 5 stars is a very difficult book to put down, once you begin to read it you’ll soon find that you can’t stop until you’ve reached the end.

J.K. Rowling’s writing matures and becomes more and more complex with each subsequent book and the Prisoner of Azkaban is no exception, as we learn that not all is as it first seems when Harry’s Godfather, Sirius Black comes looking for revenge.

The third instalment also plays host to a variety of intriguing magical creatures including: Animagi, werewolves and Hippogriffs, while Harry has an extremely amusing ride on the ‘Knight Bus’, the transport for stranded Wizards and Witches.

The film for the Prisoner of Azkaban however, has a number of problems and doesn’t quite match up to the quality of its predecessors.

See also:

Book 1 – The Philosopher’s Stone

Book 2 – The Chamber of Secrets

Book 4 – The Goblet of Fire

Book 5 – The Order of the Phoenix

Book 6 – The Half-Blood Prince

Book 7 – The Deathly Hallows

*Note: more reviews coming soon

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling (Book Review)

It is summertime and Harry Potter is back living with the Dursley’s for the holidays, but when he has an unexpected guest in the form of House-Elf Dobby, he ends up in a whole heap of trouble. Dobby has come to warn Harry that he will be in danger if he returns to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, but when Harry refuses to believe him, Dobby uses magic in the house almost getting Harry expelled from school.

Angry at Harry for messing up his important dinner with potential business clients, Vernon Dursley locks him in his bedroom with the promise that he will not be allowed to return to Hogwarts ever again. Fortunately, worried about his friend, Ron borrows his Dad’s flying car to check up on Harry and when the Weasley’s discover Harry’s unfortunate predicament they take him off to ‘The Burrow’ to live with them until the new school term begins.

As Harry, Ron, Hermoine Granger and the rest of the students settle back into their classes at Hogwarts, strange things begin to happen: Harry hears odd whispering voices, Mrs Norris, Mr Filch’s cat turns up almost dead after a petrification curse and a rogue bludger persistently attempts to knock Harry off his broomstick during the first Quidditch match.

It seems that Dobby’s prediction may be coming true and Harry’s life is in danger, now that the Chamber of Secrets has been opened. But just who exactly is the mysterious Heir of Slytherin and why open the Chamber now?

Can Harry and his friends figure out the puzzle and prevent the monster, let loose from the Chamber of Secrets, from killing Hogwarts students?

Favourite Quote:

“There is a plot, Harry Potter. A plot to make most terrible things happen at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry this year.” – Dobby the House-Elf. p16

At 4 out of 5 stars the second novel in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series doesn’t quite manage to captivate the reader in the same way as its predecessor. However, with serpents, spiders and a strange creature known as Dobby, The Chamber of Secrets is still a pretty fun novel as it tells of the young wizard Harry Potter and the adventures during his second year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

See Also:

Book 1 – The Philosopher’s Stone

Book 3 – The Prisoner of Azkaban

Book 4 – The Goblet of Fire

Book 5 – The Order of the Phoenix

Book 6 – The Half-Blood Prince

Book 7 – The Deathly Hallows

** More reviews coming soon

My Corona: A Novella by Andrew Mackay (Book Review)

My Corona is a rush release to capitalise on the current crisis. This is badly written, full of spelling and grammar errors, and is very Americanised despite the writer being in the UK. The character’s dialects got on my nerves and made the book difficult to read. While the content may be relevant, shows similarities to current events and provides an insight into future possibilities, I just couldn’t get on-board with it.

It does make the reader think, and I originally began to feel bad about planning to give this a 1 star rating, until I reached the end and the writer’s diatribe. He accuses those likely to give his book 1 star as being ignorant of the situation, placing blame on those that don’t warrant it and siding with those they shouldn’t. Despite beginning his note discussing censorship and right to free speech, he tells us to reserve our blame for those who really deserve it, and give authors like him 5 star ratings just for writing a book voicing their own opinion. Also that those who give 1 star ratings basically deserve what’s coming to them, due to their own arrogance.

Well sorry, but this honest 1 star review has less to do with coronavirus and the novellas content, and more about this writer’s awful attitude, and a story that is badly written, badly formatted and a headache to read. If this book hadn’t been so rushed, hard to follow in the beginning, and placed in front of the sharp, roving eyes of a proofreader, maybe it could have been enjoyable. I’m glad this only cost me 99p.

Supernatural: Fresh Meat by Alice Henderson (Book Review)

Fresh Meat is book number eleven in the series of TV Tie-in novels from the CW show Supernatural, and is written by Alice Henderson. It takes place during season seven between episodes 5 (Shut Up, Dr. Phil) and 6 (Slash Fiction), and technically comes before book ten in the series if you read them in chronological order.

 

…possible spoiler warning for those not familiar with the TV series…

Continue reading “Supernatural: Fresh Meat by Alice Henderson (Book Review)”