Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K Rowling (Book Review)

Harry Potter is coming of age, and the protective charms that Professor Albus Dumbledore, Headmaster for Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, placed around him after the unfortunate death of his parent’s, Lily and James, will cease to exist. Coupled also by the unexpected loss of the Headmaster himself at the end of the previous school year, now puts the famous wizard in very grave danger. Harry is now vulnerable to an attack from his nemesis, the Dark Lord, Voldemort.

Instead of returning to Hogwarts for their 7th and final year of education, Harry and his two closest friends: Ronald Weasley and Hermione Granger are attempting to fulfil Dumbledore’s dying wish, to find and destroy the remaining horcruxes.

Horcruxes are magical artefacts that belong to Lord Voldemort, each object containing a small piece of the dark wizard’s soul. Two have already been destroyed, leaving the rest still unaccounted for. Harry must eliminate these powerful artefacts and weaken Voldemort’s powers, ensuring that the Dark Wizard can finally be defeated once and for all.

But, will they succeed?

 

 

The Deathly Hallows is the final novel in J.K. Rowling’s phenomenally successful Harry Potter series and while the majority of the story pales in comparison to its predecessors, at 4 out of 5 stars it provides a fitting conclusion to the 7 book set.

Harry and his friends have an important task to complete, which has been placed upon them alone due to the untimely death of Professor Albus Dumbledore, but armed with very little knowledge about the mission ahead, are the three youngsters capable of defeating the most powerful and dangerous wizard of all time?

The story is fraught with fear, deception and the death of all who get between Lord Voldemort and his enemy, but can love really conquer all as Dumbledore claims, or is there a better way to conquer the Dark Lord?  

Find out what happens to the famous young wizard in the concluding chapter, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.

See also:

Book 1: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

Book 2: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Book 3: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Book 4: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Book 5: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

Book 6: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling (Book Review)

One Halloween night when a wizard named Voldemort attacks Lily and James Potter, the only person to survive is their young son Harry, leaving a lightning shaped scar on his forehead. Aware that young Harry is going to be famous as a result of this extraordinary situation that he’ll never remember, Albus Dumbledore and Rubeus Hagrid, friends of his parents place the boy in the care of his aunt and uncle to keep him as far away from the magical community as possible, until he comes of age.

Vernon and Petunia Dursley, not being magical themselves, disapprove of Lily Potter and anyone else who gets involved in that sort of nonsense. As a result their treatment of Petunia’s nephew, Harry is so detrimental that they have him sleeping in a cupboard under the stairs, despite having two spare bedrooms, and try to keep him as far away from their only son, Dudley afraid of the strange events that sometimes happen in their nephew’s presence.

As Harry approaches his 11th birthday he receives his invitation to begin attending Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, however fearful of the magical influence, Vernon Dudley hides his letters from him. When Hagrid tracks Harry down he is both astonished and appalled to discover that the boy has been taught nothing of magic and is unaware of his parent’s abilities.

For Harry Potter is a Wizard and soon begins his lessons at Hogwarts School of Wizardry with his new friends, Ron Weasley and Hermoine Granger. However, the trio soon make a startling discovery: One of the Professors has been attempting to steal an item that is protected by a three headed dog, in an out-of-bounds area inside the school. When Hagrid refuses to believe their story, Harry realises that it is up to himself and his friends to stop the theft, but just what exactly does Albus Dumbledore have hidden beneath that secret trap door that someone wants so badly?

Favourite Quote:

“To the well-organised mind, death is but the next great adventure.” – Professor Dumbledore. p320

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone is a truly fascinating read, filled with magic spells, potions and flying broomsticks, as well as an unexpected twist. J.K. Rowling has done an amazing job with her very first fantasy novel for children.

At 5 out of 5 stars this will have you constantly turning the pages, dying to discover new secrets from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and find out what potential new dangers Harry, Ron and Hermoine will be facing next.

 

See also:

Book 2: The Chamber of Secrets

Book 3: The Prisoner of Azkaban

Book 4: The Goblet of Fire

Book 5: The Order of the Phoenix

Book 6: The Half-Blood Prince

Book 7: The Deathly Hallows