Revenger Series: Book 3 – Bone Silence (Book Review)

Bone Silence is the third of the 3 Revenger series books by Alastair Reynolds, and continues the story of Arafura and Adrana Ness, and their rag-tag crew aboard the Revenger.

…potential spoiler warning for those who haven’t read the preceding novels…

You can check out my reviews of book 1, Revenger here via this link, or book 2, Shadow Captain here.

Continue reading “Revenger Series: Book 3 – Bone Silence (Book Review)”

Revenger Series: Book 2 – Shadow Captain by Alastair Reynolds (Book Review)

Shadow Captain is the second of the 3 Revenger series books by Alastair Reynolds, and its story begins precisely where Revenger left off.

…potential spoiler warning for those who haven’t read Revenger

You can check out my review of book 1, Revenger here via this link.

Continue reading “Revenger Series: Book 2 – Shadow Captain by Alastair Reynolds (Book Review)”

Revenger Series: Book 1 – Revenger by Alastair Reynolds (Book Review)

Having read a few Alastair Reynolds books before, I decided to pick up his three Revenger novels: Revenger, Shadow Captain and Bone Silence, hoping for more of his gripping hard sci-fi adventures. However, I later discovered that these are actually young adult books and so are not quite up to the same standards as earlier reads.

…potential spoiler warning…

Continue reading “Revenger Series: Book 1 – Revenger by Alastair Reynolds (Book Review)”

Ringworld Series: Book 2 – The Ringworld Engineers (Book Review)

Ringworld Engineers, the sequel to Larry Niven’s classic science fiction novel, Ringworld continues the tale of Louis Wu, and the alien explorers. Twenty-three years after leaving the Ringworld behind them, Louis, Nessus’s ex-lover, Hindmost to the Pierson’s Puppeteer race and the catlike kzinti, travel back to the massive alien construction.

 

…beware of possible spoilers for those not familiar with book 1, Ringworld…

You can read my review of book one, Ringworld here via this link.

Continue reading “Ringworld Series: Book 2 – The Ringworld Engineers (Book Review)”

Ringworld Series: Book 1 – Ringworld by Larry Niven (Book Review)

On his 200th birthday Louis Wu meets a Pierson’s Puppeteer, a strange sentient species of alien being thought to have vanished from known space. The Puppeteer, Nessus wishes to recruit him for an exploration into the far reaches of space. These unlikely allies are joined by two others to form an unusual group of four, and together they travel to what is known as Ringworld; a star orbited by a massive ring. These four intrepid explorers must now visit the Ringworld, tasked by those who lead the Pierson’s Puppeteer race, with learning more about the unusual world and its occupants.

 

Told from Louis’s Wu’s human perspective, we explore the Ringworld along with these characters, learning more about it as they do. The book is classic science fiction full of adventure and hard science. I love these types of stories, with their detailed descriptions of spaceships, planets, alien beings and the physical science which allows it all to co-exist. Trepidation and excitement at new discoveries keep the reader immersed in this fascinating world.

I found the book to be well-written and engaging, with a good balance of science and story. Though it begins to drag a little in the middle, with the seemingly endless and repetitive motion of the characters as they fly over desolate landscapes, rarely landing or interacting with the Ringworld natives. The ridiculous quarrels between the explorers also annoyed me slightly, dragging the story out. Towards the end I noticed a few errors cropping up, which is unusual in professionally published paperbacks such as this, but since I’ve read plenty of books with a lot more issues, it didn’t put me off reading.

As is usually predictable with science fiction books, there are numerous alien beings and strange species with difficult to pronounce names, such as Halrloprillalar Hotrufan and Zignamuclickclick. However, at 4 out of 5 stars Ringworld is an enjoyable classic for those who love their sci-fi filled with hard science and adventure.

I now look forward to checking out book two, The Ringworld Engineers.

 

See also:

Book 2: The Ringworld Engineers

Book 3: The Ringworld Throne

Book 4: Ringworld’s Children

Brent Bolster Investigations: Book 4 – Double Infinity (Book Review)

Double Infinity is the fourth science fiction novel in the hilarious Brent Bolster Investigations series by author Michael Campling, and it is reminiscent of writers such as Douglas Adams and Red Dwarf creators Rob Grant and Doug Naylor.

…warning: potential spoilers for those not previously familiar with the Brent Bolster series…

My review of book one, Dial G for Gravity can be found here.

Continue reading “Brent Bolster Investigations: Book 4 – Double Infinity (Book Review)”

The Solaris Saga by Janet McNulty (Book Reviews)

This review comprises the four novels in Janet McNulty’s space opera series, The Solaris Saga. You can read my full review of book one ‘Solaris Seethes’ via OnlineBookClub.org here.

 

…beware of spoilers… Continue reading “The Solaris Saga by Janet McNulty (Book Reviews)”

Brent Bolster Investigations: Book 3 – The Surrana Identity (ARC Review)

The Surrana Identity is the third book in the Brent Bolster series by author Michael Campling, and is dedicated to fans of Douglas Adams.

 

Book three continues the hilarious adventures of Private Detective Brent Bolster and his oddball associates: Vince Claybourne, Rawlgeeb – a green humanoid alien known as a Gloabon – and Algernon, their pet fish who lives in a diving helmet.

Those who’ve read the previous books in the series will already be familiar with Brent’s nemesis, Surrana, the sneaky Gloabon Assassin who has already made numerous attempts to kill him. In this story, Surrana has been held captive by the GIT (Gloabon Institute of Technology) and experimented upon. However, she manages to slip her confinement and escape her tormentors, fleeing from Earth and into space.

Frustrated with the situation, and despite their need for tact and diplomacy, the GIT reluctantly hire Brent to track down their former captive. Brent has reservations considering his complicated history with Surrana, but Vince soon changes his mind and convinces him to accept the job. However, what is intended to be a simple stealth mission, turns out to have a rather different agenda completely, and the gang find themselves in a tricky spot.

 

As with its predecessor, The Surrana Identity begins with a helpful glossary of characters which allows the reader to easily keep track of who-is-who, and where-is-where, which definitely eliminates confusion for those not familiar with the characters. I must admit that I’m a bit of a geek for things like glossaries and appendices and maps, so anything with additional details that makes life easier is definitely a win.

Aside from Brent, Vince, Rawlgeeb and Algy, a number of our favourite characters return for this novel, including: Dex, Zeb & Dr. Cooper. As far as the story goes, I found it incredibly funny and I chortled so often, that I had to take regular breaks just to recompose myself. The ridiculous banter between Brent and his cohorts is what makes this series so great, from fancy pencils to popular culture references and alien abductions.

We also have serious moments too though, where the Artificial Intelligences, Jason and Dee, get caught up in some existential angst and question both their orders and their chances of survival. As a person creeped out by the idea of AIs turning on humans, I definitely found this part interesting.

At 4 out of 5 stars, The Surrana Identity is my kind of humorous sci-fi story, and in my opinion they just get better with each new release. However I received a complimentary copy of the book directly from the author and my honest review is compelled to point out a few missing words and minor errors – slightly more so than I’d like to see.

I for one am eagerly awaiting book 4, keep them coming Michael.

 

See also:

Brent Bolster: Book 1 – Dial G for Gravity

Brent Bolster: Book 2 – Dead Men Don’t Disco

Brent Bolster: Book 4 – Double Infinity

 

Brent Bolster Investigations: Book 2 – Dead Men Don’t Disco (Book Review)

Dead Men Don’t Disco is the latest offering from author Michael Campling and it follows on from the first Brent Bolster Investigations novel, Dial G for Gravity. Those not already familiar with this sci-fi comedy series can read my review of Dial G for Gravity here.

Having made an unfortunate enemy of Gloabon assassin, Surrana – see Dial G for details – Brent and his associates must now find a way to thwart Surrana’s attempts at revenge.

Meanwhile, simple government peace talks take a bad turn when a faulty translator forces Lieutenant Commander Dex to enlist Zeb, the science officer and slightly bonkers cybonic lifeform on board The Kreltonian Skull, to act as interpreter and translator instead. The result; a drunken kidnapping which sparks an interspecies war.

In an attempt to diffuse the situation, Rawlgeeb is escorted to The Gamulon but is then taken captive by Dex and Zeb on The Kreltonian Skull as hostage, in retaliation to the Gloabon Captain’s abduction of their crew. Concerned for his friend Brent undertakes a mission of rescue however, will his unusual methods of negotiation and coercion have the tact and diplomacy necessary to diffuse such a sensitive situation? Best grab that fancy coffee and hope for the best.

 

The more I read of this Douglas Adams-esque series, the more side-splittingly hilarious it becomes. Whether this is because the comedy level has increased from the previous book, or because I have become more comfortable or more at ease with the personalities of these characters, who can really say. However, my final review for 2018 is a highly recommended 5 out of 5 stars.

While I’m not necessarily always a fan of robots/androids, I love the character of science officer Zeb, he is such tremendous fun. He’s probably up there in my list of top 3 robots/androids/cyborgs from literature, along with Kryten and Marvin The Paranoid Android.

Where the Brent Bolster series outshines Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s series though, is in one fairly major area, its plot. By which I mean that Dead Men Don’t Disco actually has a cohesive storyline which is easy to follow, makes complete sense and doesn’t veer off on random tangents.

One final point to note is the handy glossary of characters that was included at the beginning of the book; a very useful addition if you ask me. While I was initially suspicious of the Brent Bolster series, I’m really glad that I decided to check them out as they’ve definitely put a few smiles on my face. If you’re looking for some light-hearted comedy to help you unwind during the overly-stressful festive season, then look no further than Dead Men Don’t Disco.

Watch out for book 3, The Surrana Identity, currently expected in early 2019.

 

See also:

Brent Bolster: Book 1 – Dial G for Gravity

Brent Bolster: Book 3 – The Surrana Identity

Brent Bolster: Book 4 – Double Infinity

Brent Bolster Investigations: Book 1 – Dial G for Gravity (ARC Review)

Dial G for Gravity is a fun sci-fi comedy book by Michael Campling, and its humour is reminiscent of Douglas Adams novels – both Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Dirk Gently.

The story follows private investigator Brent Bolster who goes missing for 10 days and suffers amnesia, after a botched alien abduction. Accompanied by his assistant, Vince and fellow abductee, Maisie, Brent must figure out what happened, not just to himself and Maisie, but also the thousands of other people who’ve recently vanished from Earth.

Meanwhile, falsely blamed for the spat of botched abductions by the Gloabon Government, Gloabon Liaison Officer Rawlgeeb is exiled to Earth, and tasked with an undercover operation to get to the bottom of the issue. He joins up with Brent, and together this unlikely team uncovers a major alien conspiracy that is sure to make you fear the existence, and motivations of extra-terrestrials.

 

Along with the nods to Douglas’s novels, this book also reminds me of the style of comedy that can usually be found in the writings of Red Dwarf creators, Rob Grant and Doug Naylor. In essence this is my type of humour, and therefore my style of novel.

I particularly enjoyed Dr. Cooper, a minor character who works at the Gloabon Institute of Technology, and while I appreciate that this is maybe just a coincidence, the man held similar characteristics and peculiar mannerisms to his namesake, Dr. Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory TV show. I couldn’t help but imagine Sheldon in my head while reading Dr. Cooper’s dialogue, and this added to my enjoyment of the overall story.

All in all Dial G for Gravity is a pretty good space comedy, with well thought out characters and some interesting alien races in the Gloabons, Andelians and the Kreitians. I received an ARC of this book direct from Michael Campling and as it has a few spelling errors my review rating is just 4 out of 5 stars, however I’m looking forward to reading more about both Brent Bolster and the Gloabons, as well as Zeb, the cybonic lifeform, so hopefully there will be more books to come in the Brent Bolster Investigations series.

In addition, Dial G for Gravity comes complete with a handy list of characters at the end, for folks who appreciate that sort of thing.

 

See also:

Book 2 – Dead Men Don’t Disco

Book 3 – The Surrana Identity

Book 4 – Double Infinity